Description

Location: Reno Aces, Greater Nevada Field Upstairs

Contact: gsn@gsnv.org

GSN REGULAR MEMBERSHIP—SEPTEMBER 24, 2021 MEETING*

The GSN Regular Membership Meeting will be held in-person only on Friday, September 24, 2021.  The new meeting location for Reno Meetings is at the Reno Aces Greater Nevada Field in the 250 Lounge and Good Hops restaurants (up the stairs to your left as you face the ticket office).

Speaker:  Matthieu Harlaux, University of Nevada, Reno

Title: “Tourmaline in magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits: garbage can mineral or sensitive mineral probe?”

 Date:   Friday, September 24, 2021

Time:  Drinks @ 6:00 pm, Dinner @ 6:30 pm, Talk @ 7:30 pm

Location: Reno Aces Greater Nevada Field, 250 Lounge & the Good Hops restaurants (up the stairs to your left as you face the ticket office)

Dinner Cost: $35.00 per person.

Reservations are due by 5 p.m. on SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH @ MIDNIGHT!

NOTE: You will be invoiced $35 if you do not cancel your reservation by Monday, September 20th!

Payment Options:

  • SCROLL DOWN TO PREPAY FOR DINNER WITH A CREDIT CARD
  • SCROLL DOWN TO RSVP and pay at the door with a check
  • Non-Members Social Hour cost is $5 payable at the door


*GSN will continue to follow County, State and CDC Covid-19 requirements/guidelines and adapt as needed. At the time of this publication, face coverings are required in counties with substantial or high community transmission rates while in public indoor spaces regardless of vaccination status. All counties that host GSN events are currently considered to have substantial or high community transmission rates. The Executive Committee urges its members to strictly adhere to CDC guidelines and recommendations, such as receiving the vaccine as soon as eligible and wearing masks at all indoor GSN gatherings.  Please do not attend GSN events if you feel sick or have a known Covid-19 exposure.

Abstract:

Tourmaline is a common mineral in many hydrothermal ore deposits and has long been referred to as a garbage can mineral due to its complex crystal chemistry that accommodates many major and trace elements. In the last years, many studies reinvestigated the potential of tourmaline as a recorder of ore-forming processes and as an indicator for mineral exploration. In this talk, I will show how a careful study of tourmaline can yield valuable information on magmatic-hydrothermal processes based on recent results obtained on the world-class San Rafael Sn-Cu deposit (Central Andean tin belt, southeast Peru). San Rafael is currently one of the largest and highest-grade primary tin deposits in the world, with total resources >1 Mt Sn. Mineralization at San Rafael consists of quartz-cassiterite-sulfide veins and breccias hosted by an upper Oligocene (ca. 25 Ma) peraluminous S-type granitic complex and by Ordovician metasediments. Tourmalinization is abundant at the deposit scale and three major generations of tourmaline are distinguished based on petrography and geochemistry: (i) late-magmatic tourmaline found in peraluminous granites as nodules and disseminations; (ii) pre-ore hydrothermal tourmaline formed during post-magmatic alteration and veining-brecciation; and (iii) syn-ore hydrothermal tourmaline forming microscopic veinlets and overgrowths, locally intergrown with cassiterite. In situ analysis of trace elements and oxygen and boron isotopes in tourmaline reveals the evolution of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, exsolved during early degassing of the magma chamber and, subsequently, their mixing with modified meteoric waters triggering cassiterite deposition. These results demonstrate that tourmaline is a powerful mineral probe for understanding dynamic fluid processes in magmatic-hydrothermal systems and opens new research perspectives for studying tourmaline-rich deposits in Nevada.

Speaker presentation:

Matthieu Harlaux is assistant professor of economic geology at the University of Nevada, Reno (USA) within the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology since 2019. Matthieu received his MS and PhD degrees in economic geology at the University of Lorraine in Nancy, France in 2012 and 2016, respectively. During his PhD, Matthieu worked on granite-related tin-tungsten deposits in the Variscan French Massif Central with a specific focus on direct dating of ore minerals and trace element geochemistry and fluid inclusion study of wolframite. From 2017 to 2019, Matthieu joined the University of Geneva, Switzerland, where he did a two-year postdoc working on the trace element and multi-isotopic analysis of tourmaline from the world-class San Rafael tin-copper deposit, Peru. His main research topic focuses on better understanding ore-forming processes in magmatic-hydrothermal systems by using trace element geochemistry, fluid and melt inclusions study, and in situ stable isotopes to trace fluid and metal sources, with current research projects in the Central Andes and in Nevada.

Details

09/24/2021 18:00:0009/24/2021 21:00:00America/Los_AngelesGSN Regular Membership Meeting, Reno, NVGSN REGULAR MEMBERSHIP—SEPTEMBER 24, 2021 MEETING* The GSN Regular Membership Meeting will be held in-person only on Friday, September 24, 2021.  The new meeting location for Reno Meetings is at the Reno Aces Greater Nevada Field in the 250 Lounge and Good Hops restaurants (up the stairs to your left as you face the ticket office). Speaker:  Matthieu Harlaux, University of Nevada, Reno Title: “Tourmaline in magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits: garbage can mineral or sensitive mineral probe?”  Date:   Friday, September 24, 2021 Time:  Drinks @ 6:00 pm, Dinner @ 6:30 pm, Talk @ 7:30 pm Location: Reno Aces Greater Nevada Field, 250 Lounge & the Good Hops restaurants (up the stairs to your left as you face the ticket office) Dinner Cost: $35.00 per person. Reservations are due by 5 p.m. on SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH @ MIDNIGHT! NOTE: You will be invoiced $35 if you do not cancel your reservation by Monday, September 20th! Payment Options:
  • SCROLL DOWN TO PREPAY FOR DINNER WITH A CREDIT CARD
  • SCROLL DOWN TO RSVP and pay at the door with a check
  • Non-Members Social Hour cost is $5 payable at the door

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*GSN will continue to follow County, State and CDC Covid-19 requirements/guidelines and adapt as needed. At the time of this publication, face coverings are required in counties with substantial or high community transmission rates while in public indoor spaces regardless of vaccination status. All counties that host GSN events are currently considered to have substantial or high community transmission rates. The Executive Committee urges its members to strictly adhere to CDC guidelines and recommendations, such as receiving the vaccine as soon as eligible and wearing masks at all indoor GSN gatherings.  Please do not attend GSN events if you feel sick or have a known Covid-19 exposure.
Abstract: Tourmaline is a common mineral in many hydrothermal ore deposits and has long been referred to as a garbage can mineral due to its complex crystal chemistry that accommodates many major and trace elements. In the last years, many studies reinvestigated the potential of tourmaline as a recorder of ore-forming processes and as an indicator for mineral exploration. In this talk, I will show how a careful study of tourmaline can yield valuable information on magmatic-hydrothermal processes based on recent results obtained on the world-class San Rafael Sn-Cu deposit (Central Andean tin belt, southeast Peru). San Rafael is currently one of the largest and highest-grade primary tin deposits in the world, with total resources >1 Mt Sn. Mineralization at San Rafael consists of quartz-cassiterite-sulfide veins and breccias hosted by an upper Oligocene (ca. 25 Ma) peraluminous S-type granitic complex and by Ordovician metasediments. Tourmalinization is abundant at the deposit scale and three major generations of tourmaline are distinguished based on petrography and geochemistry: (i) late-magmatic tourmaline found in peraluminous granites as nodules and disseminations; (ii) pre-ore hydrothermal tourmaline formed during post-magmatic alteration and veining-brecciation; and (iii) syn-ore hydrothermal tourmaline forming microscopic veinlets and overgrowths, locally intergrown with cassiterite. In situ analysis of trace elements and oxygen and boron isotopes in tourmaline reveals the evolution of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, exsolved during early degassing of the magma chamber and, subsequently, their mixing with modified meteoric waters triggering cassiterite deposition. These results demonstrate that tourmaline is a powerful mineral probe for understanding dynamic fluid processes in magmatic-hydrothermal systems and opens new research perspectives for studying tourmaline-rich deposits in Nevada. Speaker presentation: Matthieu Harlaux is assistant professor of economic geology at the University of Nevada, Reno (USA) within the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology since 2019. Matthieu received his MS and PhD degrees in economic geology at the University of Lorraine in Nancy, France in 2012 and 2016, respectively. During his PhD, Matthieu worked on granite-related tin-tungsten deposits in the Variscan French Massif Central with a specific focus on direct dating of ore minerals and trace element geochemistry and fluid inclusion study of wolframite. From 2017 to 2019, Matthieu joined the University of Geneva, Switzerland, where he did a two-year postdoc working on the trace element and multi-isotopic analysis of tourmaline from the world-class San Rafael tin-copper deposit, Peru. His main research topic focuses on better understanding ore-forming processes in magmatic-hydrothermal systems by using trace element geochemistry, fluid and melt inclusions study, and in situ stable isotopes to trace fluid and metal sources, with current research projects in the Central Andes and in Nevada.
Reno, NV
Event StartsEvent Ends
09/24/202109/24/2021
All Day Event
6:00pm9:00pm